Tranmere

Tranmere has had many local heroes from the Merseyside area throughout its history but for one season the heroes of the club were men from North of border as they put right the wrong of Tranmere Fourth Division place.

The 1960-61 season had been one of the worst seasons in the club’s history with 115 goals being conceded and some shocking defeats such as the 9-2 hammering Tranmere received from Queens Park Rangers. Not surprisingly Tranmere were relegated in the Fourth Division for the first time in the club’s history after 34 seasons in the Third Division.

For the next five seasons Tranmere attempt to gain promotion back into the Third Division under the watchful eye of Dave Russell. Over the five seasons Tranmere came close to achieving their goal of promotion coming fifth twice in the 1964-65 and 1965-66 seasons.

By the 1966-67 season Tranmere were ready to make that final push that would hopefully see them promoted back to their rightful place in the Third Division.

The season didn’t get off to the best of starts with a 0-0 draw against local rivals Chester and the following game saw Tranmere lose Bradford 0-1. However Tranmere picked up their form and beat Bradford Park Avenue 3-2 and then Hartlepool 2-0.

The season ploughed on seeing Tranmere picking up points here and there but big wins against Crewe (5-0) in October showed Tranmere were still on course to achieve the promotion position they so desperately wanted.

After going through February undefeated after winning four games in a row and conceding one draw Tranmere looked like a shoe in for promotion but a drop in form meant it came down to the wire and by the second to last game of the season Tranmere still hadn’t secured fourth place.

On Friday the 12th May Tranmere would entertain Rochdale at Prenton Park in a must win game if they didn’t want another fifth place finish. Even if Tranmere managed to beat Rochdale promotion wasn’t guarantee and it was likely it would come down to the last game of the season.

For many the game was somewhat of a forgone conclusion as Rochdale’s season had not been successful as they languished near the foot of the table but as the teams came out of the tunnel to 12,000 fans cool heads were needed to ensure this game was win.

The cool heads seemed to prevail as Tranmere took the lead after Stevens managed to fire in a shot from a Johnny King cross. Tranmere ramped up the pressure on Rochdale and eventually it paid off as Hudson managed to score a second for Rovers on the 42 minute.

After the half time team talk Russell sent Tranmere out feeling optimistic that the win was now a given. However the cool heads of the first half seemed to vanish as Storeton push Rochdale player Calder in the penalty area. Six minutes into the second half Rochdale were made the score 2-1 bringing the win for Tranmere suddenly into question.

With Tranmere dominating the first half it was now Rochdale’s turn to dominate as they pressured the Rovers goal. Not long after scoring the penalty Jenkins for Rochdale sent the ball flying into the box with Calder only needing a touch to equalise but he failed to reach the ball.

On the sixtieth minute though the game was finally put to bed as Williams managed to put the ball in the back of the Rochdale net from a Hill throw in. From this point on Tranmere dominated the game again but failed to add anymore goals to their tally.

The 3-1 win for Tranmere meant that after five seasons of Fourth Division football Tranmere would be returning back to the Third Division. Luckily for Tranmere results went their way meaning the Rochdale game secured their promotion.

With promotion secured –only for the second time in the club’s history- the crowd invaded the pitch to cheer on the home team and the celebrations could now begin. In the changing rooms the champagne was popping and the celebrations were being led by the club’s Scottish contingent Bill Bothwell the acting Chairman, the Manager Dave Russell, team captain Eddie Robertson and the Tranmere legend George Yardley who even put his kilt on.

The success of that season had been in part down to the youth programme that the club’s Scottish contingent had built with the likes of Roy McFarland –who would later play of England- ensuring Tranmere could compete not only in the Fourth but also the Third Division. Unfortunately for McFarland he watched Tranmere win promotion as he was six weeks into an injury which saw him miss the final games of the season.

These Scots had taken Tranmere back to their ancestral home of the Third Division, a division they help form in 1921 and even managed to win it in 1938.

Advertisements